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What Real Estate Appraisers Might Not Disclose To You - W Darrow Fiedler

What Real Estate Appraisers Might Not Disclose to You

The real estate appraisers help people in determining the value of their real estate properties. They assist buyers with the valuation information so that they don’t get overcharged by property owners. Similarly, the sellers, too, are protected against possible underpayments by willing buyers.
Real estate appraisers are also useful when a property owner intends to obtain a loan using their property as collateral. Without their input, the homeowners may secure smaller loan amounts than expected or fail to meet the minimum financial assistance requirements. Below are some things that the real estate appraisers may not want one to know.

They Don’t Know Much about an Area

Before the real estate property boom, appraisal officers used to work within specific counties or states. However, this has never been the case in recent years. Most Appraisal Management Companies (AMCs) have increased the tendency of sending their officers to different counties and states. Therefore, it’s likely that a real estate appraiser works in areas they know very little about.

They Hate Being Followed Around

Some homeowners or buyers usually find themselves trying to keep in touch with their appraisers most of the time. While they may think it’s the right thing to do, it’s their real estate agents and inspectors they should be spending more time with. Therefore, it’s appropriate to give the appraisers some space once they’ve received the valuation report.

They Do Most of the Evaluation Off-the-Site

Property valuation assessment should take up to about 8 hours. Surprisingly, most appraisal officers would take as little as a half of the total set assessment time. It happens so because of the increased use of technology in the process. For instance, some AMC agents could use video clips of the home from drones and computer-stored data about the property to compile the final appraisal report.

Last Minute Renovations Don’t Always Add the Value of the Property

Many people believe that making some little changes in the kitchen or the bathroom would increase their property’s selling price. But unfortunately, this isn’t true, and the appraisers know – only that they’ll never talk about it.

Consulting the real estate agents or inspectors in advance is by far the best way of ensuring a successful sale of a property. By doing so, the homeowner would get to know more than what an appraiser is always willing to share.

W. Darrow Fielder - The Right Time to Invest in Real Estate

When is the Right Time to Invest in Commercial Real Estate?

A market downturn can often be the opening you need to secure the commercial real estate you want. However, you’ll want to understand multiple factors that stand in between you from getting real estate at its cheapest point or getting it as it’s rising. Understand these factors skilled real estate investors use today when choosing to purchase commercial real estate.

Knowledge

Entering into a new market of commercial real estate that you haven’t dealt with before can be tempting if you’re looking for profits but you must stick to what you know. The reason you’ll want to stick to your knowledge is that you’ll be able to identify more easily properties that won’t bring you as much risk as going into a completely different industry. Over time, you’ll be able to even grow your knowledge of the industry you belong in by talking to other skilled investors. Ensure that you are always sticking with what you know when you are looking to invest in commercial real estate.

Local Experts

As you look beyond where you live, you might be tempted to invest in areas all around your country and around the world. It can be very profitable for you to split up your investments based on location but it’s key that you bring in local experts while doing so. Working with local experts will give you help in understanding key differences cities may have from one another such as real estate tax, how often property sells in a specific area, what type of people are moving in, and more. Make sure that you always partner up with local experts when looking to purchase commercial real estate in a specific area.

Historical Data

Over time, the pricing of real estate can change due to various market and city conditions but you must refer to historical data rather than just current data when purchasing commercial real estate. The reason for this is that you’ll be able to compare the previous prices of real estate that you’re looking for with more key information like how many people are moving into a city along with the type of businesses that would use your commercial real estate. You’ll just want to make sure though that you consult experts that can help you understand important links historical data can have in one area over the other. Looking over historical data before purchasing commercial real estate is just one of the many other ways you can make smart purchases.

What to Consider When Investing in Real Estate with a Partner

Investing in real estate is a great way to add to your investment portfolio by securing a physical property that will net you returns in the future. Even so, the prospect of buying an investment property can be daunting for many people, which makes it much more appealing for a lot of first-time investors to go into their first deal with a partner. A partnership helps defray the cost of the investment, and it also provides a buffer for error by distributing responsibility across multiple parties, instead of just one. Still, there are a few aspects of partnerships in real estate investing that can be troublesome if both parties are not knowledgeable about potential pitfalls. Here are three aspects of real estate investing partnerships to be aware of before signing on the dotted line.

1) Who will supervise and pay for work on the property? Part of investing in real estate is often performing standard renovations to make sure that the property nets the highest amount of revenue when it gets put on the market. Before you put money down, have a frank discussion with your potential business partner about whose responsibility it will be to handle the work on the property – who is paying for it, who is supervising it, and who is completing the punch list once it has been completed. This conversation will help to inform both parties about their individual responsibilities, and it will save you an uncomfortable discussion later on if and when important details fall through the cracks.

2) How are you splitting equity? Presumably, the intention of investing in real estate is to increase its value and net greater returns on the property over time. It’s important to mutually agree on a split in equity before the property makes it to the market; if you wait until afterwards, you’ll automatically increase the likelihood that you’ll end up having an acrimonious, partnership-ending conflict over the split in equity later on, which could cost you not only a business partner, but also a significant amount of money.

3) What will you do if one party wants to leave the partnership? As with any business, it’s important to draw up a contract between both parties that clearly and irrefutably outlines what the terms of the agreement are and what will happen if one person decides that they no longer want to be involved in the ownership of the property. If you have a contract in place, then there will be no miscommunication about the roles and responsibilities of each person down the line, and there will be no conflict when one person decides to disengage, because you’ll already have a plan in place for this exact situation and others like it.

While it can be challenging to invest in real estate with a partner, it can also be infinitely more rewarding and significantly more lucrative. So, then, as long as you go into your business arrangement with open eyes and clear guidelines for the functions and division of labor for your business, you will set yourself – and your business partner – up for success in the rewarding world of real estate investing.

Co-Founder of PayPal Launches New Credit Startup

Max Levchin, one of the co-founders of Paypal, has announced that he has raised an impressive $425 million of funding for his newest venture, Affirm, the mission of which is to replace credit cards with micro-loans at a point of sale.

The startup’s service, which is called “Buy With Affirm,” allows shoppers to pay forgoods online in a series of monthly installments, in lieu of one lump-sum payment that is often beyond the customer’s means. By submitting your name, cell phone number, birthday and the last four digits of your social security number, you can apply for membership, at which point Affirm’s algorithm considers a number of variables – like the regularity with which you receive paychecks and how liquid your finances are – to determine how much risk is associated with your finances and whether you are a suitable candidate to receive Affirm’s micro-loans.

W. Darrow Fiedler

With Affirm, PayPal co-founder Max Levchin is hoping to disrupt the credit industry completely.

Describing the motivation behind his new company’s mission to Fortune Magazine, Levchin pointed to the fact that many Millennials not only feel no sense of loyalty towards their banks, but actually possess a marked distrust of large financial institutions. This was shown in a research study conducted by Viacom Media, in which 10,000 Millennials were polled about Big Finance and agreed across the board that all four of the biggest banking brands were on their list of the ten least-loved brands in the USA. Levchin’s solution, then, is to provide these Millennials with a banking alternative that offers increased transparency, in addition to assistance paying off larger amounts of money.

Since Affirm’s launch, the number of merchants they’re partnered with has increased steadily. Last year, they were only used by 100 merchants, and this year, they are used by 700. According to Levchin, users are also hopping on the Affirm bandwagon in impressive numbers, and many are coming back again after their first use.

Clearly, some heavy-hitting investors agree with Levchin that when it comes to Millennial banking and credit, something’s got to give. Founders Fund, Affirm’s newest investor, just contributed $100 million to the company’s financial backing, and they have already received investments from Lightspeed Venture Partners, Spark Capital, Khosla Ventures, Andreessen Horowitz and Jeffries.

It will be interesting to see if Levchin is successful in doing for credit what PayPal did for online payments; only time will tell.

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